COP21: China continues to hold a hard bargain

By J.Fan

Now or Never

Ninety nation coalition aims for an agreement to hold global warming at 1.5 degree Celsius and The United Nations Assistant Secretary-General on Climate Change appears optimistic on reaching a climate change agreement at COP21, Paris. However, the political dynamics and various interests intensify as the climate change talk approaches the final stage.

 

There are still a few sensitive subjects to be discussed such as is the draft ambitious enough, how to finance developing countries in greener technology and who should handle the bigger share of the global warming burden, developing countries or developed countries?

 

Major developing countries like China and India maintain their views that rich countries should do the bulk of the carbon-cutting. However, “60-65% of emissions now come from developing countries,” reported BBC News. China and the United States top the global carbon dioxide emission charts; however, many countries oppose the lack of transparency in China’s environmental data. The good news is that researchers found that carbon emission may show a decline by 0.6 percent for 2015 because of China’s economic instability, according to a new research published by the journal Nature Climate Change. However, the global emission varies depending on the global market.

 

“I’m told by a senior source that Chinese delegates in small group meetings are firmly opposing measures in the text to nod towards a maximum temperature rise of 1.5C. They are also opposing the plan for the world to become “emissions neutral” in the second half of the century,” reported by BBC environmental analyst Roger Harrabin, “while Saudi Arabia is making the same point more aggressively.”

“We have very limited hours remaining. I am urging the negotiators to make their decision based on global vision,” said UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, adding that “this is not a moment [for] talking about national perspectives.”

 

France has confirmed that the climate change talk aims to conclude on Saturday, December 12, a day later than expected.

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